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Some think of the brain as a machine, describing its neurons as wires and its processes as electrical circuits. I prefer to think of the brain as a story. Our evolutionary history is imprinted in the pattern of connections written by the genes we share as humans. Our individual stories are written as our experiences tweak those connections, advancing the plot through the unique and dynamic perspectives, memories, preferences, and cognitive styles that make us each such complex characters.
My brain is a story of brains and stories. As a neuroscientist, I have applied network analytic tools to the human brain and to the scientific literature, seeking to understand how we communicate across our neuroanatomical structures and more broadly, across the field of cognitive neuroscience. As a poet, I have pursued questions that are inspired by science, yet unanswered or unanswerable by its limited tools. For samples of my articles, poems, and other projects, I invite you to browse this site.



                                                                                           — Elizabeth Beam

                                                       

    Some think of the brain as a machine, describing its neurons as wires and its processes as electrical circuits. I prefer to think of the brain as a story. Our evolutionary history is imprinted in the pattern of connections written by the genes we share as humans. Our individual stories are written as our experiences tweak those connections, advancing the plot through the unique and dynamic perspectives, memories, preferences, and cognitive styles that make us each such complex characters.

    My brain is a story of brains and stories. As a neuroscientist, I have applied network analytic tools to the human brain and to the scientific literature, seeking to understand how we communicate across our neuroanatomical structures and more broadly, across the field of cognitive neuroscience. As a poet, I have pursued questions that are inspired by science, yet unanswered or unanswerable by its limited tools. For samples of my articles, poems, and other projects, I invite you to browse this site.

                                                                                              — Elizabeth Beam